Reservoir Dogs movie review

From The Quentin Tarantino Archives


Will your vision on the thrilling definition of tipping stay the same? Will we ever forget what "Like A Virgin" is about? Most likely not. "Reservoir Dogs" takes you in a chokehold from the extremely entertaining opening scene on to the final credits, you'll stay glued onto your seat without looking away just once. Even though famous for the notorious "ear"-sequence, "Reservoir Dogs" goes much and much further, the old school way of storytelling in combination with the young and fresh approach this film will forever go down in history as a milestone in "cool" filmmaking, there's simply no other way of put it.

In 1992 while "Basic Instinct" and "The Bodyguard" were taking over the box office, Quentin Tarantino blessed us with this flaming masterpiece, "Reservoir Dogs" reminded me of a 1940's crime flick with a contemporary touch of gangster satire attached to it.

6 Guys, all named after colors by their boss Joe Cabot (Lawrence Tierney), rob a jewelry store untill things get just a little out of hand, the robbery quickly converts into an all-out massacre when Mr. Blonde (Michael Madsen) goes out of hand and plugs the staff and custumors, the police arrives surprisingly fast and kills 2 members of the gang on their getaway. The survivors, Mr. White (Harvey Keitel), Mr. Pink (Steve Buscemi), Mr. Blonde (Michael Madsen) and badly unjured Mr. Orange (Tim Roth) rush themselves to an empty warehouse where everyone shares their own vision on what happend. The men quickly come to the conclusion that there is in fact a rat in the house.

The rest of the film pretty much circles around this subject while giving us flashbacks exactly when we need them.

Over the years "Reservoir Dogs" has always been looked at as art and cult-film, while actually it contains much more than most people want to beleive, it deserves a place in every top 100 list and credit not only for the memerable quotes, but also for the almost perfect choice in casting and wonderful way of storytelling, highlighted especially in the surprising, bloody and thrilling ending.

Reviewed by Johnny Exhale

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